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Oh no...I said I wasn't going to post again about food...


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Posted by Amanda E on April 16, 2003 at 15:02:21:

In Reply to: Re: Devil's Advocate?... posted by mikecoscia on April 16, 2003 at 12:43:41:

But...who's to say that raising them to adult size in a few months is better than in 2 years?

In the wild I'm pretty darned sure that herps don't reach breeding size as quickly as they do in captivity, and they do alright, baring any predatory or human interference. I'm sure the only reason they grow so quickly in captivity is because they have access to food all the time.

I have many herp friends (including Norm Damm - some of you may know him from breeding Honduran Milksnakes) that believe that herps that are fed less often, like they eat in the wild, are healthier and live much longer than those that are fed very often. Now here I'm talking about snakes, but I'm assuming that some of this could apply to geckos as well.

I do know geckos have different nutritional demands and different metabolic rates than snakes, but I would assume the same reasoning applies: Those raised slower are healthier and live longer than those that are raised quickly to impose our breeding demands on them.


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