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Re: thanks for your insight, here's more pics...


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Posted by PHWyvern on November 03, 2002 at 23:10:38:

In Reply to: Re: thanks for your insight, here's more pics... posted by Mike H. on November 03, 2002 at 18:38:23:

:Hi Wyvern,

:Here's a couple pics from out back, just took them today. Do these give you any better idea of exactly what they are?

=========

The photos really do seem to match the winter aspect of the wisteria vines.

The general rundown on wisteria to the best of my knowledge is...

Wisteria, is a plant in the legume (pea family) that is a twining vine capable of reaching over 30 feet in length and is well known for it's springtime showing as it leafs out and flowers with large, drooping clusters of purple-blue (or less common white), fragrant flowers. Vines grown from seed may take as many as 15 years before they begin to flower, while those grown in garden nursery's from grafts bloom much sooner. The vine, when left to run rampant rather than carefully pruned and cultivated, often climbs trees or whatever else it can latch onto for support. Winter aspect is a snarled, tangled mass of naked vine. The plant is normally hardy and long-lived, and trunks can become quite large and the vines typically are woody and tough. There are several species of Wisteria native to N. America and to China. The Chinese wisteria (Wisteria sinensis) is what many people commonly tend to plant as it has a better show of flowers. This plant thrives so well in Florida it is considered to be on the states invasive species list.


All in all, the use of wisteria should be done under careful conditions. I certainly would not use it for any animal (like mammals, birds, etc.) that is likely to want to chew/gnaw/eat the bark, wood, leaves, flowers, seeds as the plant is toxic in that respect...ingestion can lead to kidney/liver damage. But for animals that do not have the natural inclination to chew, gnaw, or eat wood/bark it could be acceptable cage material/decoration (mainly snakes and some lizard species). I've not heard of any dermatitis irritations caused by direct contact with the wood in regards to people and since snakes and lizards have tougher skin than we do, I highly doubt it would cause problems for them either.

Wyvern



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