kingsnake.com - reptile and amphibian classifieds, breeders, forums, photos, videos and more

return to main index

  mobile - desktop
follow us on facebook follow us on twitter follow us on YouTube link to us on LinkedIn
 
Click here for LLL Reptile & Supply
Professional Cages & Rack Systems
Made in the USA - Freedom Breeder
Locate a business by name: click to list your business
search the classifieds. buy an account
events by zip code list an event
Search the forums             Search in:
News & Events: Herp Photo of the Day: Pine Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Industry Pioneer Don Hamper Has Passed Away . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Python . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: World Lizard Day . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Gecko . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Iguana . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Turtle . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Python . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Kingsnake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Monitor . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Frog . . . . . . . . . .  Innertubes . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Crocodile . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Boa . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Reds, Winders, and Geckos . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Tortoise . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Salamander . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: World Snake Day . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Where Have All the Sand Dwellers Gone. . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Arrests made with stolen vehicle, uranium and a rattlesnake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Chain Kings, North and South . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Turtle . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Saving Injured Turtles with Bras . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  The Rich mountain salamander . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Newt . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Python . . . . . . . . . .  Cross-country Snake Species . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  First documented parthenogenesis birth in Water Dragons . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: World Croc Day . . . . . . . . . .  The Mexican Short-tailed Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Frog . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Python . . . . . . . . . .  The Reddest of the Reds . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Kingsnake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Speckled Racer . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Turtle . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Anacondas born by virgin birth . . . . . . . . . .  Anacondas born by virgin birth . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Egyptian Tortoises . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Frog . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Turtle . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  A Beautiful Search . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Frog . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Frog . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Python . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  A Snakey Kind of Evening . . . . . . . . . .  In Memoriam: Jim Fowler . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  The Common Map Turtle . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Python . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Frog . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Gecko . . . . . . . . . .  The Rich mountain salamander . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Boa . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Alligator . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Earth Day! . . . . . . . . . .  Come and Meet Bob. . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Kingsnake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Salamander . . . . . . . . . .  To Cuba, Again . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Happy National Pet Day . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Salamander . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Frog . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Turnip-tailed Agamas . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Python . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Southern Chorus Frog . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Frog . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Boa . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Frog . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Turtle . . . . . . . . . .  Blackie’s Back . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Gecko . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  The Kirtland’s Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  The Barking, Biting, Brazilian Horned Frog . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  The Variable Bush Viper . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Anaconda . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Tiger Salamanders . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy World Croc Day! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Newt . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Python . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Toad . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Romance is Ribbiting for Romeo and Juliet . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Kingsnake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  A Snake of Many Colors, The Eyelashed Pit Viper . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Salamander . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Boa . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Python . . . . . . . . . .  It’s a What? . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Gecko . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Kingsnake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Ringed Salamanders . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Crocodile . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Boa . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Frog . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Snake . . . . . . . . . .  Grotto Salamander . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Kingsnake . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Toad . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Lizard . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Gecko . . . . . . . . . .  Our First Red Pygmy . . . . . . . . . .  Toads Catch Unusual Lift . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Happy Rattlesnake Friday! . . . . . . . . . .  Herp Photo of the Day: Axolotl . . . . . . . . . .  Man vs crickets: final battle . . . . . . . . . .  Edmonton Reptile & Amphibian Society Mee - Aug. 20, 2019 . . . . . . . . . .  Bay Area Amph. and Reptile Society Meeti - Aug. 23, 2019 . . . . . . . . . .  Suncoast Herp Society Meeting - Aug. 24, 2019 . . . . . . . . . .  ReptiDay Naples - Aug. 24, 2019 . . . . . . . . . .  ReptiCon Montgomery - Aug. 24-25, 2019 . . . . . . . . . .  ReptiCon Johnson City - Aug. 24-25, 2019 . . . . . . . . . .  Northern Virginia Reptile Expo - Aug. 24 2019 . . . . . . . . . .  Chicago Herpetological Society Meeting - Aug. 28, 2019 . . . . . . . . . .  ReptiCon Killeen - Aug. 31- Sept.01, 20 . . . . . . . . . .  ReptiCon Jackson - Aug. 31- Sept.01, 20 . . . . . . . . . . 

It's a very good idea, ... more


[ Follow Ups ] [ Post Followup ] [ The Burmese Python Forum ]

Posted by Rob Carmichael on April 22, 2003 at 06:57:07:

In Reply to: It's a very good idea, ... more posted by BrianSmith on April 21, 2003 at 17:30:00:

Brian hit it on the head....to do this procedure on a large constrictor will COST a LOT of money; in fact, most facilities (our's included) would simply stop taking in burms if it came to that (even though I personally think it is a great idea)...we simply cannot afford to do this with every burm/large constrictor that comes our way (I'd be looking for a new job in a hurry!)....we already are spending a ton of money just to get most of these burms back into good health. So, until we find a way to make this cost effective, we will continue to have problems.

As a follow up to Brian's post below (about Brian's position that the problem isn't about overpopulation of burms in captivity): BTW....it is very refreshing that we can actually debate/discuss a potentially heated topic without the usual bashing and uneducated responses we typically see...kudos to everyone!
Here was my response to a post below (that may have been buried):
Brian, I hear what you are saying about the issue that the problem isn't about overpopulation of captive burms, but our wildlife center is NOT a regional facility; 80-90% of the burms that come our way are in our immediate area (this doesn't even include the Chicago area)....that is a LOT of burms being abadoned in a relatively small geographic area. If you throw in Chicago alone, that number probably quadruples. The stat that would be VERY interesting to me is to see just how many burms, among all of the breeders, are being produced today in the U.S. and compare that with the available data that we have in terms of how many burms become abandoned or up for adoption across the U.S....that would be a tough stat to find. If you control populations, you control the problem; it is really that simple in my opinion and I realize that for folks who make a living breeding burms/retics/etc. that may come off as a slap in the face, however, unlike people like you who are responsible, most breeders are completely unaware of what happens to their burms after they are shipped...I'll tell you where they go. They are pampered and cuddled for the first year or two until they reach the magical 8-10' mark. It is then that most burm owners quickly realize that they may have made a big mistake. They become uncomfortable having a large constrictor under the same roof as their kids/etc. The snake then stops being held and interacted with (other than to toss in a rat or rabbit every now and then). Their health declines and once they become too big, they just try to dump them off with another house to start the cycle over (and most of these people I deal with are very well intentioned people who feel horribly for what they are doing). Recently, a friend of mine rescued a 19' albino burm that had been kept in a trailor home STUFFED in a 75 gallon tank....try to think of that! This may be extreme but it happens more often than people care to imagine. Is is a population problem or a bad owner problem...both! There are too many burms and not enough good homes for them. So, if we cut the numbers being produced, we get closer to finding an equilibrium where the numbers of captively produced burms equals the numbers of suitable homes for them. If there were more responsible breeders like yourself who ensured customers that you would take back any burm that became unmanageable, we could reduce the problem. Unfortunately, for every good person like yourself, there are just as many unscrupulous folks who are just out to make a quick buck. Also, for every good home that you find for your burm, there are countless of bad homes that are buying burms...there just aren't enough responsible and capable people who can realistically care for a giant snake like a burm. So, in my very humble opinion, I feel that there are too many burms on the market to keep up with the very few good homes that are available for these burms. Depending on how you look at it, we either have too many burms or not enough good homes; either way, this is a real problem that has only scratched the surface.

This doesn't mean that I am against the ownership of large constrictors....quite the contrary! I am ALL for private ownership of large constrictors, AS LONG AS PEOPLE ARE MATURE, COMMITTED, DEDICATED, RESPONSIBLE, and have the resources to properly care for these giant reptiles.

:This abandoned burmese problem isn't due to too many burmese being produced. It is due to irresponsible owners. You say you only take in 50 per year from your city/area. Heck man,. that's only the equivalent of a single clutch. So by the arguments that this is due to overpopulation of burms then just one fewer clutch of eggs in your region would have solved that. Obviously this would not be the case. I think that those same kids or owners would have gotten them elsewhere or another breed and would have ended up doing the same thing in the end. I think that there are probably thousands of burms hatched out in every considerably-sized city each year and I also think that many of those end up in decent homes with owners that take good care of them and love them. I hate to say this, but my common sense tells me that the vast majority of the rest die due to poor care or mishap. And then a small percentage of them become abandoned and subsequently have to be rescued. While this troubles me greatly, I don't feel that this is strictly due to there being too many burmese produced. At the same time I am all for fewer numbers of normals and ZERO importation. But I think that there will be the problem regardless of how many are produced (to a reasonable point, of course). And I don't feel that every decent herper should have to pay a severe price for the actions and irresponsibilities of the neglectful minority herper that mistreats or abandons their snakes. It just wouldn't be fair. I for one, as a breeder, make sure that my offspring only go to responsible good homes and will take the snake back in the event that the person cannot care for it any longer. I wish other breeders would do something similar. I feel that only things like this can lead to a solution to this problem.


:I have thought of this before myself. I don't know how feasible it would be. I have never taken the time to research the pros and cons of it before. But here's what little I do know: Reptiles are generally harder to euthanize and I have read that they are more prone to dying as a result than mammals. Also, their scales and "skin" would be a lot more difficult to stitch or seal an incision should a invasory surgery be required for "fixing" them. And lastly, it would likely cost a LOT of doe-rae-me to pay for it and most of the rescues are underfunded as it is. Who is going to pay for it? But if this could be done I would be all for it.

:
::I was just thinking. Everyone has been talking about the fact there is surplus of burms in rescues and so forth.

::And seeing VA Rescue's add in the classifides made me think. Most adoption places will not give burms out to breeders, and I highly reccomend that, but, how do you know FOR SURE that they will not be bred?

::You can fix (spay/nueter) rabbits, rodents, dogs, cats, and nearly every animal. Why should you not be able to fix a snake? Has it been done before? I there are some methods (as least I think) of proventing breeding but it isn't permenant.

::If you could fix rescue burms, or some babies that you sell to homes, would that not help the amount of burms being bred and scattered everywhere?

::I'm not saying that all burms should be fixed, or can be, but to prevent breeding when you adopt out a burm, or sell babies to people that plan to breed to futher decrease the amount of burms out there being bred.

::I dunno, I'm rambling.

::-Randilyn

:
:





Follow Ups:




[ Follow Ups ] [ The Burmese Python Forum ]