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Re: Identification of dead South-african snake


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Posted by hein on September 16, 2001 at 09:24:46:

In Reply to: Identification of dead South-african snake posted by Job Stumpel on September 09, 2001 at 09:28:23:

: Hi,

: I photographed a dead hit-by-car snake at the Kruger National Park in South-africa last July. I haven't been abe to identify it yet, does anyone want to give it a try? I put its pictures and some more info on the internet, just click on the link. If you think you've identified it, please let me know at jstumpel@hotmail.com !
: Thanks in advance!

: Job Stumpel, the Netherlands.

Job, it is definitely one of two possible species of the Psammophis genus. Unfortunately the distance between eye and snout is not visible - an important distinguishing factor between P. mossambicus and P. brevirostris. Over the past years, I have kept both species on temporary basis. I do have a hunch that it is rather P. mossambicus (Olive grass snake)- a larger species that I believe are more common in the Kruger National Park than brevirostris (ref: Field guide to Snakes and other Reptiles of Southern Africa & Fitzsimons' Snakes of Southern Africa)

Both these species are backfanged, active, fast and diurnal. The venom is usually harmless. If you need more info, I can try to help.



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